Be Blank Mind In Agreement Crossword Clue

If you start with the simplest clues, you can fill in your grid. Fill-in-the-blank indications are often the simplest because they use common nouns and phrases. If you solve more puzzles, you`ll also see that designers reuse references to common connecting words such as ear, aleole, and era. A question of some interest is whether the process of retrieving items that respond to one of the clues is influenced by the fact that you are looking for an object that matches two clues, rather than this one. Is the process that can be prefixed in the zone affected by the fact that one wants a result that could also be a prefix for the gram? I have the impression that the answer is yes. I am not aware of any mandatory empirical evidence on this issue, but one can imagine an experiment in which some participants generate words (or parts) suggested by individual clues and generate other words (or parts) suggested by double indications. The time required to produce certain words is taken in both cases, and the question is whether dual indications produce the words concerned in less time than is predicted from the times needed to produce them in response to each indication. What makes ENY a less effective indication than other letter combinations? Look at the words that correspond to the other indications (MANY, ZANY, TINY, BONY, PONY, PUNY). In all cases, the emphasis is on the first syllable, and the Y has the pronunciation of the short vowel; and this applies not only to the word, but also to the way in which the three-letter mention would be pronounced on its own.

In other words, if you`re trying to find a word that sounds like — rhyming with that, has the same stress pattern as — the clue, you`ll probably succeed. (Note that in some cases the sound comparison is better than in others – MANY fit the usual type of PRONUNCIATION OF ANY better than z.B ZANY, but the voltage scheme is consistent in both cases.) Anwar Sadat was Egypt`s third president until his assassination in 1981. Sadat received in 1978, along with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Bégin, the Nobel Peace Prize for the role he played in shaping the 1978 Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty at Camp David. . . .